ICatCare

International Cat Care is a cat welfare charity, which provides advice and information to veterinary and welfare organisations, and to members of the public. Of particular interest is the 'Behaviour Studies' section of their website, where recent scientific studies related to cat behaviour and welfare are analysed and interpreted.

PETS CAN DO

The University of Lincoln's 'Pets Can Do' webpage is designed to encourage pet owners and pet lovers to get involved with research happening at the University of Lincoln. Within the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln the Animal Behaviour, Cognition and Welfare Team carries out a wide range of research through staff and student projects. All sorts of animals are involved in this welfare-friendly research and other practical activities on campus - from dogs and cats to fish and reptiles.

Users can sign up through the site to participate in exciting research projects with their pets.

COMPANION ANIMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Zazie Todd PhD authors this blog, in which 'the science behind people's relationships with their pets' is explored. Topics are sourced from peer-reviewed academic literature, and explained in a very accessible style. Subjects covered span from breed specific development of dogs to the hand rearing of wolves, and there is plenty of discussion on the science of human animal interactions.

DO YOU BELIEVE IN DOG?

Canine researchers Mia Cobb and Julie Hecht run this highly entertaining blog in 'pen-pal' format, each taking turns to pen their thoughts on the latest developments in canine behaviour. This blog often features guest writers, and is a great option for people looking for something for light, though provoking reads on all aspects of canine science. Check back regularly for 'everything from love and loss to welfare problems hiding in plain sight!'

DOG SPIES

'Dog Spies' a blog hosted by Scientific American, aims to 'explore the science behind the dog in your bed'. Authored by PhD Student Julie Hecht of 'Do you Believe in Dog?' fame, this blog posts regularly on real life applications of canine science - 'everything from dog humping and crotch-sniffing to canine cognition and the infamous "guilty look."'

CAT FACS

[Description taken from the catFACS website]

The Cat Facial Action Coding System (CatFACS) is a scientific observational tool for identifying and coding facial movements in cats. The system is based on the facial anatomy of cats and has been adapted from the original FACS system used for humans created by Ekman and Friesen (1978). The CatFACS manual details how to use the system and code the facial movements of cats objectively. The manual is freely available to the scientific community.

DOG FACS

[Description taken from the DogFACS website]

The Dog Facial Action Coding System (DogFACS) is a scientific observational tool for identifying and coding facial movements in dogs. The system is based on the facial anatomy of dogs and has been adapted from the original FACS system used for humans created by Ekman and Friesen (1978). The DogFACS manual details how to use the system and code the facial movements of dogs objectively. The manual is freely available to the scientific community.